Professional Development, Point Acquisition and Portfolio Building for Ghanaian Teachers

cpd UNION INTER PROFESSIONAL teachers TRAINING ICT A/R: GES, NTC engage 3 Districts to develop PLC Session Materials teacher
A/R: GES, NTC engage 3 Districts to develop PLC Session Materials

Ferdinand|EducationGhana|December 01|Professional Development, Point Acquisition and Portfolio Building for Ghanaian Teachers

What is Teachers’ Continuous Professional Development?

Teacher Professional Development (PD) is a systematic and sustained process by which teachers maintain, improve and expand their professional knowledge, values, experiences, and skills and their application to real life.

Required activities that involve the development of teacher qualities required to carry out their professional and technical duties during their teaching career. a training and education program organized within or outside the school environment which NTC approves as being relevant to the teaching profession and meet prescribed standards.

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The Continuous Professional Development Framework outlined certain activities that every teacher in the pre-tertiary schools must undertake to be able to accrue points as part of their Professional Development to be able to renew their Teaching Licenses.

 

The Pre-tertiary Teacher Professional Development and Management (PTPDM) policy outlines the importance of PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT for teachers.

 

The policy emphasizes a competency-based approach that requires regular In-Service Education and Training (INSET) to develop teachers’ capacities.

According to the policy, teachers will be assessed based on defined competencies and
evidence of professional proficiency.

It is therefore the responsibility of individual teachers in Ghana to select, undertake and document relevant PD activities they partake in for the purposes of growing through the profession to maintain their professional status.

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Any PD activity undertaken that is not listed as indicated, should be referred to the Governing Board of the National Teaching Council for approval.

Teacher training logbooks have been developed to document teachers’ training records and related PD credit points.

Where the means of documenting the activities are no immediately available or there is no designated person to verify the activities, it is the responsibility of the teacher to save evidence (E.g., registration, certificate, and attendance records) of the activities for submission at the appropriate time and place as may be directed by NTC.

In addition to the PD programs attended, teachers are required to upload their portfolio records onto the PD portal for onward assessment by Portfolio Assessors.

 

The point-gaining activities are grouped into two broad categories of which teachers are expected to partake in both activities within three years before they can be qualified to renew their licenses.

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The two  activities are categorised into  two broad categories namely;

  1. Supply Driven Activities and
  2. Demand-Driven Activities.

 

Supply Driven

The teacher can access training from the employer through either of the following:

  1. Professional Learning Communities-PLC (School Based or Departmental Based )
  2. Cluster-Based or Community of Practice-CoP (Workshop for Heads of Institutions
  3. Workshop for a particular subject or for a particular class (BS3, BS1, KG2)
  4. Teachers who are assigned common roles and responsibilities.

 

Note: Entries of two (2) SBIs and a CBI are allowed for a term. This can be done by the Director of Education or a person designated by the Director.

Office-Based Capacity Building includes

a. Intra-Departmental: DBI

b. Inter-Departmental: Cluster-Based INSET, and

c. Capacity Building for staff in an institution: SBI.

 

NOTE:  Development Partners and NGOs working closely with the Ministry of Education are also certified to collaborate with District Education offices.

NTC will collaborate with National School Inspectorate Authority (NaSIA) to monitor such training to ensure that standards are met.

 

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Demand Driven

Demand Driven Programmes are those organized by Certified Service Providers, which are being paid for.

 

Mandatory and Recommended Programmes

 

Teachers who accept postings to NTC and GES’s defined deprived areas are given opportunities to access demand-driven PD programs to be organized by GES in collaboration with the NTC without any payment except for transport and feeding.

 

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Components of PD Programmes

The detailed contents and credit points of the respective programs are determined by NTC based on the needs of the teaching profession over a given period. Basically, the PD program covers annual conferences of registered teachers, workshops, seminars, and training on curricular knowledge, SBI, CBI, and DBI as well as other training programs approved by the NTC.

 

Teachers must access these programs at institutions certified by NTC.

The cycle of PD and Allotment of Credit Points

PD programs run for a cycle of three (3) years. This implies that every registered teacher has three (3) years to earn the minimum credit points stipulated for his/her level/rank.

This rule applies to teachers at all levels of the Education system, both public and private sectors including holders of administrative positions.

A teacher must be physically present and receive a certificate of attendance at the end of any program to earn credit points allotted to that category of PD

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Grouping of PD Activities

The training groups required to meet PD points at the various ranks have been identified as

  1. Mandatory

  2. Ranked Based

  3. Recommended

The latter is also grouped into categories based on the complex nature of the activities and the level of involvement of the teacher. Teachers at specific ranks are to access activities from all the groups.

 

1. Mandatory Courses for all In-Service Teachers

 

Mandatory Courses for all In-Service Teachers

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Mode of training for items 1 to 23 includes PLC (CBI or SBI) and CoP (DBI or Duty Based Training) or Demand-driven training.

Note: SBI/CBI/DBI (2 points by three for a year making a total of 6). It also holds for Office Based Capacity Building (Intra-Departmental is synonymous with DBI and Inter-Departmental is also equivalent to Cluster Based INSET, Capacity Building for staff in an institution is similar to SBI. These pieces of training cut across.

.

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2.  In-Service Teachers’ Rank-Based Training

 A. Newly Qualified Teachers Rank-Based Training

In-Service Teachers’ Rank Based Training
In-Service Teachers’ Rank-Based Training

 

B. Rank 1 (Superintendent 11)

In-Service Teachers’ Rank Based Training
In-Service Teachers’ Rank-Based Training

 

C. Rank 2 (Superintendent 1)

B. Rank 1 (Superintendent 11)
B. Rank 1 (Superintendent 11)

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C. Rank 3  ( Senior Superintendent 11)

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E. Rank 4  ( Senior Superintendent 1)

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F. Rank 5  ( Principal Superintendent 1)

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G. RANK 6 (Assistant Director 11)

 

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h. RANK 7 (Assistant Director 1)

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I. RANK 8 (Deputy Director )

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J. RANK 9 (Director 1)

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K. RANK 10( Director 11)

 

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NOTE: All Ranked Based PDs must be completed in a PD cycle of 3 years for regular teachers. For any other course to be certified, it must meet the National Teachers’ Standards (Training Needs) set by NTC.

The core courses and training that need to be covered by PD programs shall be designed to be appropriate for teachers at the various levels of the education system for whom it is intended.

The programs shall also reflect their daily professional challenges and subject specializations. NTC shall from time to time publish more subjects and emerging themes that may be covered in PDs.

 

3. Recommended Activities for Inservice Teachers CPD Points Building

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Table 1 provides the required points for the three categories (Rank Based, Mandatory and Recommended Activities) for the PD cycle (3 years)

Suggested PD Points Required by Teachers on the Designated Ranks within the three (3) year Cycle

 

Note: Every teacher should have at least 34% of the PD points per year or at least 1/3 of their total points per rank.

Teachers shall access training Recommended to complement training points received from both Rank Based and Mandatory activities.

The selection of recommended training is based on either teacher’s own needs assessment results or a recommendation by a supportive supervisor.

 

Awarding of CPD Points

The framework provides formulas for calculating PD points at teachers’ respective ranks.

The PD credit points and Portfolio Assessment Scores determine the professional standing of the teacher.

Teachers MUST meet these requirements to renew their licenses, otherwise, they cannot practice as a teacher.

 

 

CALCULATION OF PD CREDIT POINT

The variables involved in calculating the PD points are rank-based, mandatory, and recommended activities.

Teachers at each rank are required to accrue a certain number of PD points within a PD Cycle of 3 years.

According to the PD computation tables in this document, a teacher within 3 years will have to undertake all rank-based training programs and fifteen mandatory training programs, either of which gives two points per activity.

In addition, teachers will have to access a number of recommended training programs to add up to the points accrued for rank based and mandatory. The PD points obtained
from these three activities by calculation should sum up to the required training points per the rank of the teacher.

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TOTAL POINTS REQUIRED TO BE ACCRUED FROM EACH CATEGORY BY
TEACHERS IN SPECIFIC RANKS IN WITHIN THREE YEAR

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.NOTE: The Newly Qualified Teachers shall accrue 25 points within a year to be qualified for a full license.

The 25 points shall consist of 4 points from Rank Based Activities and 21 points from the
observation activities in the first four (4) weeks of the Induction Programme (Refer to the Induction Guidelines).

On the other hand, In-Service teachers (teachers on Rank 1 – 10) are required to have one-third of their PD cycle points in a year.

Thus, teachers are required to have one-third of each of the points assigned or allocated to mandatory pieces of training, rank-based training, and recommended activities.

 

The points expected to be accrued by a teacher in a particular rank with a year (Py) is calculated as:

Py = 1/3 (mp + Rp + rmp)

where mp = Mandatory training points for respective ranks
Rp = Rank/duty-based training points for respective ranks
rmp = Recommended activities points
Table 5 presents PD points expected to be accrued within a year by a Teacher in a Specific Rank with respect to allocated points for the three categories.

 

Table 5: Calculation of PD Points Expected to be Accrued Within One Year by a Teacher in a Specific Rank

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From the information in the table above, teachers can determine the number of points required to be accrued from a particular category in a year out of the three categories.

This will help the teacher to develop a PD Plan and work towards the achievement of the objectives of such a plan.

Teachers are required to access a minimum of five (5) mandatory trainings in a year and a total of fifteen (15) in the three-year cycle.

Therefore, to be able to determine the weight of a mandatory course for a specific rank, teachers will have to divide the number of points required from mandatory activities
in the three (3) years by fifteen (15).

For instance, a teacher in Rank 1 is expected to obtain 30 points from mandatory trainings in three (3)  years.

Thus, fifteen (15) mandatory activities within three (3) years should attract 30 points. This means each mandatory program attracts a maximum of 2 points (30/15).

Moreover, a teacher in Rank 1 who needs 6 points from Rank-based in a year as indicated in table 5, can determine the number of required rank-based activities to be accessed in a year to accrue the 6 points by simply dividing the 6 points by 2 (weighted points for one rank-based activity) and this gives three Rank-based pieces of training in a year.

 

Thus, two points are assigned to either rank-based or mandatory activity accessed by the teacher.

Similarly, for a teacher in Rank 2, the total Rank-based points to be accrued in three (3) years out of the nine (9) Rank-based activities is 18 (2 points by 9 activities). In addition, that teacher is expected to accrue 30 points from mandatory activities.

Therefore, the remaining activities will be accessed from the recommended activities based on computation in the points requirements table for each rank. This means the required points for recommended activity (rmp) for a teacher in any rank is calculated by making rmp the subject of the point-based formula:

 

Py = Rp + mp + rmp
where mp = Mandatory training points for respective ranks
Rp = Rank/duty-based training points for respective ranks
rmp = Recommended activities points
Therefore, for rank 1 which requires 60 points in 3 years, the recommended training points can be calculated as

rmp + 30 + 18 = 60
 rmp = 60 – (30 + 18)
 rmp = 60 – (48)
 rmp = 12

 

 

Teachers are to bear in mind that they are required to meet one-third of their training points in a year to maintain their professional standing status for a particular year.

Mode of TCPD Delivery in terms of the three categories

Teacher Continuous Professional Development activities can be accessed either from Supply Driven or Demand Driven Sources dependent upon the availability of such activities.

Teachers are not restricted to accessing training from only one source and are also not obliged to access every paid PD activity.

Payment for Demand Driven TCPD Programmes

Demand Driven Programmes are those organized by Certified Service Providers. The Service Providers are individuals or organizations whose training contents have been approved by NTC as relevant for teachers.

Teachers in most cases are required to pay for such training programs out of their
professional development allowance.

In such situations, teachers have the right to negotiate for their own payments and also decide on which one they may want to attend.

 

Supply Driven TCPD

Teachers at levels where the academic calendar operates for three terms (Trimester) can have a minimum of three supply-driven pieces of training per term making a total of Nine (9) pieces of training per year and Twenty-Seven (27) per the 3-year PD cycle.

Similarly, teachers at the levels where the academic calendar operates for two terms (Semester basis) shall have a minimum of Six (6) supply-driven PDs for a semester, making a total of Twelve (12) per year and 36 per the 3-year PD cycle.

However, teachers should note that training programs must be accessed proportionally from all the training categories based on the PD point calculation, meaning, pieces of training must be accessed from all categories.

Relevance of Point-Based System

1. Renewal of License

The license of every teacher shall be renewed every three (3) years. To retain the license, an individual teacher must earn the stipulated minimum credit points of the current rank within three (3) years prior to the license renewal date.

However, teachers are required to meet one-third of their training points in a year
to determine their professional standing status for a particular year.

2. Criteria for Selection

Teachers are advised to continue to participate in PD programmes after earning the minimum credit points.

This will help them to be abreast of current trends in education and also have comparative
the advantage over colleagues should it come to selection for Ghana Teacher Prize award and any other selection processes where PD points can be used as a determiner.

In addition, teachers who fail to obtain the minimum PD points on the third year of the current rank shall not be recommended to renew the teacher license and would therefore not be recognized as a teacher of good professional standing.

 

Appeals

Any teacher whose license is not renewed for failure to achieve the minimum number of PD points and feels unfairly treated may appeal the decision in accordance with the provisions of the NTC regulations.

Focus of PD

For the content of a PD to be acceptable to NTC, it must be drawn from the list of training needs and related subject matters that enhance the pedagogical skills of the teacher

 Submission of CPD Points by Public Schools

  1. Service Providers shall fill teachers’ logbooks and later complete digital logging on the portal after each programme.
  2. Participants should crosscheck their training logbooks and portfolio records with NTC to validate their data submitted by the Service Providers and Portfolio Assessors respectively.
  3. Education Directors or their Representatives shall enter PD points from SBI, CBI or any other organized by GES.

 

 Submission of CPD Points by private schools

  1. Training points relating to SBI, CBI and DBI shall be verified by NTC. The immediate supervisor of the teacher shall log any self-initiative made by the teacher to promote teaching and learning in the Logbook.
  2. Logbooks shall be submitted to the respective District/Regional Directors who have unique access to enter the accrued points upon verification.
  3. The digital logging shall be open to Directors, one (1) month before vacation and shall be closed three weeks after vacation.
  4. Front desk officers may be appointed by a director to support the entries at school levels.

 

 

UNIQUE CASES

Licensed Teachers who are not practising teaching shall be required to submit evidence of workshops, training and seminars attended which relate to the teaching profession.

If such is not provided for renewal, the teacher concerned may be requested to attend PDs related to the current rank before readmission into the profession.

Also, in situations where employers are not able to provide the required number of supply-driven activities for teachers, they (teachers) are required to rely on other available
means to accrue the needed points.

Teachers who accept postings to ‘deprived areas’ shall be given training worth of 10 points by the employer (district) without payment of any training fee by the teacher.

This is to serve as part of an incentive mechanism to attract teachers to and retain them in such places as may be defined by employers and employees.

The purpose of this arrangement is to motivate teachers to accept postings to
every part of the country.

The Role of Employers of Teachers

The employers of teachers have been very active collaborators of NTC in the drive to professionalise teaching. It is expected that they shall continue to motivate their teachers to actively participate in PD as professionally required by NTC.

The employers can do this by:

i. Granting teachers leave to attend PD programmes.
ii. Liaising with NTC to bring to the notice of teachers relevant information pertaining to
PD from time to time.
iii. Rewarding teachers who excel in PDs.
iv. Making participation in PD one of the criteria for enjoying certain benefits at work.

v. Making participation in PD a mandatory condition for promotion.
vi. Organize mandatory training for teachers including SBIs, CBIs and DBIs.

vii. Liaising with NTC to occasionally provide supply-driven training to teachers.
The benefits of teachers’ active participation in PD are immense for employers as they are for the education system.

PD is the benchmark and primary condition for teachers to remain fit to discharge
their duties many years after initial training. Therefore, supporting PD for teachers implies
empowering them to render unmatched services to both the organization and humanity.

On the other hand, depriving teachers of PD opportunities amounts to stifling their productivity and promoting quackery in the profession.

To make it easy for teachers to access professional development programmes, NTC shall certify private individuals or organizations who meet the laid down criteria
of PD service providers to send the training to the doorsteps of teachers.

 

Portfolio Building as Part of CPD Points Acquisition

Assessing teachers’ portfolios and providing feedback in the spirit of support is the best means to help teachers improve their professional practice.

Assessment of teachers’ portfolios in general is used to determine the professional growth and progression of the teacher.

Portfolio assessment has, therefore, become an important component of assessment in teacher education programmes. As part of licensing requirements, teachers in Ghana are expected to build a teaching portfolio over the period of their teaching.

Rationale Portfolio Building

The rationale for this is to have a meaningful and purposeful collection of the works or artefacts of teachers to demonstrate their knowledge, competencies and skills in teaching over time.

It is also to be used for decision making which may include requirements for promotion,
licensing and assessing, and professional growth and development of teachers.

What is a teaching portfolio?

A teaching portfolio is a meaningful and purposeful collection of work (artefacts) done by a teacher to demonstrate their knowledge and skills in teaching over time.

A teaching portfolio, then, is a collection of carefully selected work produced by the teacher as evidence of professional progress and accomplishments in learning to teach.

It is a professional learning tool that teachers can use to reflect on their
progress and professional growth over time.

Types of portfolios

There are different types of portfolios depending on the purpose. There
are, for example:

Professional portfolio: It documents academic achievements across teaching, research, and community service.

Teaching portfolio: This portfolio is specific to teaching.

Course portfolio: This type of portfolio focuses on developing and teaching a specific course(s).

Student learning portfolios: These document students’ learning achievements.

Some Uses of a Teaching Portfolio

The teaching portfolio and the process of building one can be useful professional tools for teachers in practice and teacher educators.

Teaching portfolio :
● tells the story of the development of teachers;
● allows others to reflect upon and assess the teacher’s progress
and professional growth;
● allows others to assess the teacher’s teaching skills and knowledge;
● helps teachers to get visual evidence of their approach to instruction, their best
practices and to show others the progress of their teaching during interviews.

Characteristics of Effective Portfolios

A teaching portfolio should be structured, representative and selective.

a. Structured
A structured portfolio should be organized, complete, and creative in presentation.

b. Representative
A portfolio should be comprehensive. The documentation should represent the scope of one’s work and it should be represented across time.

c. Selective

Only artefacts that demonstrate professional growth, strengths/accomplishments should be included. The quality of the materials included is much more important than the quantity.

Portfolio Content

There is a formula for preparing a portfolio. Since a portfolio is an individual product, no
two portfolios will look alike. Each item in a portfolio should be accompanied by a brief written reflection indicating;

1. what the artefact is;
2. the rationale for its inclusion in the portfolio;
3. how it fits into your view of teaching and learning; and
4. how each artefact demonstrates teaching competency.

Simply placing an artefact in a portfolio by itself may not communicate to the assessor why it is some significant professional achievement.

Also, each item should be dated to facilitate the evaluation of progress throughout the year. The artefacts in a teaching portfolio should include those listed below;

1. Teaching Philosophy

NOTE: The teacher’s own statement of teaching philosophy should be the central standard and starting point for any evaluation.

There should be consistency. In other words, teaching practice must reflect teaching philosophy. In your statement of teaching philosophy, you have to describe what you believe about teaching and learning, why you hold those beliefs and how they have shaped your teaching style.

This does not have to be long; a page or two is sufficient.

2. A video/audio tape of your best lesson/still photographs of your
teaching

3. Scheme of work/action plan for teachers in the administration

4. Lesson plans (learning plan)/implementation plan for teachers in
the administration

5. Samples of student work you have graded, showing your comments etc. or samples of activities you have evaluated showing your comments.

6. Reflective practice

7. Reflective logs

8. Your curriculum vitae

9. Hand-outs you have designed or materials you have published in line with your work

10. Assessment instruments (test items/quizzes) created by you, with their marking schemes, and an explanation of how effective (or ineffective) the assessment was used, or data collection instruments developed by you with sample data collected and analysed, and reports generated from the analysis

11. Work/task sheets drawn for students/clients

12. Circuit Supervisor’s or immediate supervisor’s assessment comments

13. Headteacher’s/ supervisor’s assessment comments

14. Peer assessment

15. List and description of learning/teaching aids (resources) that cannot be put into the portfolio

16. Reflections on your practice.

17. Number of In-Service Training attended

18. Types of in-service training attended (SBI, CBI, DBI CoP, etc.)

19. Training Logbook

20. Certificates awarded

21. School-wide information/particulars

22. Action Research conducted as part of the reflective practice

 

How to Achieve and Practicalize the Requirements for Portfolio Building

 

1. TEACHING PHILOSOPHY

Your teaching philosophy is a self-reflective statement of your beliefs about teaching and learning. It’s a one to two-page narrative that conveys your core ideas about being an effective teacher in the context of your discipline. It develops these ideas with specific, concrete examples of what the teacher and learners will do to achieve those goals. Importantly, your teaching philosophy statement also explains why you choose these options.

Guidelines for writing Statements of Teaching Philosophy
Learning Goals

• What got you interested in your discipline?

• What does your discipline mean to you?

• What do you most hope students will appreciate about your discipline?

• What knowledge, skills, and attitudes are important for student success in your discipline?

• How are these disciplinary knowledge, skills, and attitudes related to student’s academic, personal, and professional success?

Methods

• What do you see as the relationship between the student and the teacher?

• What do you see are the respective responsibilities of the student and the teacher?

• How are these relationships and responsibilities reflected in your teaching methods?

• How do these methods contribute to your learning goals for students?

• Why are these teaching methods appropriate for use in your discipline?

• How are your teaching methods attentive to student expectations and needs?

• How do your personal characteristics and values impact your choice and implementation of your teaching methods?

Assessment of student learning

• How do you know your learning goals are being achieved using your teaching methods?

• What sorts of learning assessment tools do you use (e.g. tests, papers, portfolios, journals) and why?

• What do the learning assessments say about your teaching?

2. SCHEME OF LEARNING

The scheme of learning/work is usually an interpretation of a specification or syllabus and can be used as a guide throughout the course to monitor progress against the original plan.

A. Alignment of indicators to the curricular indicators.
All stated indicators are aligned with the curricular indicators for the grade level

B. Alignment of Core Competences to curricular content.

Though the scheme targets all core competencies in the curriculum it highlights both resource and strategies to develop and enhance their use.

WHAT TO DO: YOU ARE TO PRESENT COPIES OF THE SCHEME OF LEARNING

A scanned document.

3. EVIDENCE OF TEACHING

A. Sample Learner’s Exercises You Have Marked and Graded.

Examples of learners’ work:

Exercise, Assignments, Examinations, Quizzes

WHAT TO DO

Forty-five(45) samples of learners’ work you have marked and graded, showing your comments. They must be scanned.

B. Summarized Weekly Monitoring Tool For 3 Years.

WHAT TO DO

You are to summarize your attendance for the 3 years. You can write and also it must be stamped by your head teacher for evidence’s sake.

4. LEARNING PLANS

A learning plan is a description of how you intend to achieve your desired outcomes in learning. A learning/lesson plan is a teacher’s detailed description of the course of instruction. A daily learning/lesson plan is developed by a teacher to guide class learning.

WHAT TO DO

You are to attach Fifteen (15) Learning plans of lessons you have taught for each term so making Forty-five (45) for the year. You should scan and upload them.

5. PARTICIPATING IN CO-CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES

Co-curricular activities are activities that take place outside of the classroom but are still tied to the classroom curriculum in some way. Examples of Co-curricular Activities are Sports, Music and Dance, Drama, Debate and discussion, Story writing competitions, Essay writing competitions, Organization exhibitions, Celebration of festivals, and Spelling Bees.

WHAT TO DO

You are to write a brief report covering at least 2 co-curricular activities you have taken part in within the term. You can attach pictures to it if any.

6. EVIDENCE OF PARTICIPATION IN SCHOOL-BASED ACTIVITIES

1. Evidence of In-service Training workshop/CPD.

WHAT TO DO

You are to provide evidence on at least five In service training workshop/CPD participated (Certificates/ photographs). In-service training/CPD must be recorded in the teacher training logbook.

2. Report on Core Competencies from the Mentors.

WHAT TO DO

Your mentor is to write a brief report indicating at least five (5) core competencies used in your lessons and those that needed support to be used in subsequent lessons.

3. Minutes of Formal Meetings attended.

WHAT TO DO

You are to upload minutes of at least 5 formal meetings (e.g. meetings with mentor or lead mentor or any other education officer, Head of schools, SISO etc) You can contact the school’s secretary for the minutes.

4. Head Teachers’ Recommendation.

WHAT TO DO

You are to upload your head teacher’s recommendation letter (it must be stamped and signed) indicating at least 4 co-curricular activities supported by the teacher in addition to 4 general functions consistently performed in the learning environment.

5. Mentor’s Comment.

WHAT TO DO

You are to upload your Mentor’s comments showing satisfactory conduct, performance and willingness of the teacher to learn and lend support to peers and learners. Your mentor must sign and stamp.

7. EVIDENCE OF PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT.

Professional development is learning to earn or maintain professional credentials such as academic degrees to formal coursework attending lifelong learning, conferences, CPD and informal learning opportunities situated in practice.

AREAS OF PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

i. WRITE UP ON COLLABORATION

WHAT TO DO

A write-up in 400 words indicating evidence of willingness to collaborate with colleagues demonstrated with more than two (2) pieces of evidence of participation.

ii. RECORDS OF training ATTENDED.

WHAT TO DO

You are to upload documents on 6 or more varied training attended (i.e your recordings in the teacher logbook on 6 varied pieces of training attended)

iii. RECOMMENDATIONS FOR TRAINING.

WHAT TO DO

You are to make recommendations for the sustenance and enhancement of competencies already acquired.

iv. USE OF TECHNOLOGY.

WHAT TO DO

You are to upload evidence in the form of videos with dates on the regular use of appropriate technology within the learning environment to support learning.

v. A REPORT ON CORE COMPETENCIES.

WHAT TO DO

You are to write a brief report on any of the core competencies that you can use/have used in your lessons and those that you need support to help you to use in subsequent lessons.

The report should adequately describe the various methods used to support learners to develop their core competencies and dates quoted in the report on the use of the identified core competencies reflect dates in the learning plan when they were used.

The Curriculum Framework identifies six core competencies and these have been used to guide the development of the Assessment Framework.

The six competencies are:

● Critical thinking and problem solving

● Creativity and innovation

● Communication and collaboration

● Cultural identity and global citizenship

● Personal development and citizen leadership

● Digital literacy

8. REFLECTIVE PRACTICE

Reflective practice is the ability to reflect on one’s actions so as to take a critical stance or attitude towards one’s own practice and that of one’s peers, engaging in a process of continuous adaptation and learning.

Teachers in a school come together and;

a. Think about how they work.

b. Acknowledge their strengths, but also recognise their weaknesses.

c. Consider the impact their actions have on children and their families.

d. Review their methods to improve the quality of their practice.

e. Identify and resolve problems.

f. Be open to listening and trying out new ideas.

WHAT TO DO

A brief summary of what was discussed in the teachers’ reflective practice meeting.

 

9. IDENTIFICATION STRATEGIES AND INTERVENTION PROCESS (ACTION RESEARCH)

Action research refers to a wide variety of evaluative, investigative, and analytical research methods designed to diagnose problems or weaknesses of a learner and help develop practical solutions to address them quickly and efficiently.

The general goal is to create a simple, practical, repeatable process of iterative learning, evaluation, and improvement that leads to increasingly better results for the learner. A simple illustrative example:

▪️Identify a problem to be studied

▪️Collect data on the problem

▪️Organize, analyse, and interpret the data

▪️Develop a plan to address the problem

▪️Implement the plan

▪️Evaluate the results of the actions taken

▪️Identify a new problem

▪️Repeat the process

WHAT TO DO

You are to describe how you identified the learning needs of a learner in your class and explain how you addressed the learning needs (Action Research) 600 words

Rubrics or Guidelines for the Assessment of Teachers’ Portfolios

 

 

Professional Development, Point Acquisition and Portfolio Building for Ghanaian Teachers | 20Professional Development, Point Acquisition and Portfolio Building for Ghanaian Teachers | 21Professional Development, Point Acquisition and Portfolio Building for Ghanaian Teachers | 22Professional Development, Point Acquisition and Portfolio Building for Ghanaian Teachers | 23Professional Development, Point Acquisition and Portfolio Building for Ghanaian Teachers | 24Professional Development, Point Acquisition and Portfolio Building for Ghanaian Teachers | 25

 

Rubrics or Guidelines for the Assessment of Newly Qualified Teachers’ Portfolios

Professional Development, Point Acquisition and Portfolio Building for Ghanaian Teachers | 26Professional Development, Point Acquisition and Portfolio Building for Ghanaian Teachers | 27Professional Development, Point Acquisition and Portfolio Building for Ghanaian Teachers | 28

Professional Development, Point Acquisition and Portfolio Building for Ghanaian Teachers | 29Professional Development, Point Acquisition and Portfolio Building for Ghanaian Teachers | 30Professional Development, Point Acquisition and Portfolio Building for Ghanaian Teachers | 31

Professional Development, Point Acquisition and Portfolio Building for Ghanaian Teachers | 32

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Professional Development, Point Acquisition and Portfolio Building for Ghanaian Teachers | 38

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Professional Development, Point Acquisition and Portfolio Building for Ghanaian Teachers | 40

Professional Development, Point Acquisition and Portfolio Building for Ghanaian Teachers | 41

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Professional Development, Point Acquisition and Portfolio Building for Ghanaian Teachers | 43

Professional Development, Point Acquisition and Portfolio Building for Ghanaian Teachers | 44

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Professional Development, Point Acquisition and Portfolio Building for Ghanaian Teachers | 46

Professional Development, Point Acquisition and Portfolio Building for Ghanaian Teachers | 47

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Professional Development, Point Acquisition and Portfolio Building for Ghanaian Teachers | 49

Professional Development, Point Acquisition and Portfolio Building for Ghanaian Teachers | 50

Professional Development, Point Acquisition and Portfolio Building for Ghanaian Teachers | 51

NB Teachers can use the rubrics for in-service teachers or that of Newly Qualified Teachers to prepare their potfolios

Check Also:

How to write and Address a Letter of Sponsorship as a School in the GES HERE

How to write and address any form of Letter to the Ghana Education Service HERE

How to write and Address an Application for Car Maintenance Allowance as a Teacher HERE

How to write and Address an Application for Responsibility Allowance as a Teacher HERE

Check This Out: Top 10 Steps to Register and write Exams in KATon Computing Training Workshop

 

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